Storyboards and Concept Art for Walt Disney’s 1950 Cinderella

storyboard1

Photograph of Walt Disney in front of a Storyboard for Fantasia

What Is A Storyboard?

A storyboard is a graphic organizer in the form of illustrations or images displayed in sequence for the purpose of pre-visualizing amotion picture, animation, motion graphic or interactive media sequence. The storyboarding process, in the form it is known today, was developed at Walt Disney Productions during the early 1930s, after several years of similar processes being in use at Walt Disney and other animation studios. Wikipedia

Origins

The storyboarding process can be very time-consuming and intricate. Many large budget silent films were storyboarded but most of this material has been lost during the reduction of the studio archives during the 1970s. The form widely known today was developed at the Walt Disney studio during the early 1930s. In the biography of her father, The Story of Walt Disney (Henry Holt, 1956), Diane Disney Miller explains that the first complete storyboards were created for the 1933 Disney short Three Little Pigs.[1] According to John Canemaker, in Paper Dreams: The Art and Artists of Disney Storyboards (1999, Hyperion Press), the first storyboards at Disney evolved from comic-book like “story sketches” created in the 1920s to illustrate concepts for animated cartoon short subjects such as Plane Crazy and Steamboat Willie, and within a few years the idea spread to other studios. Wikipedia

Disney and Storyboards

According to Christopher Finch in The Art of Walt Disney (Abrams, 1974), Disney credited animator Webb Smith with creating the idea of drawing scenes on separate sheets of paper and pinning them up on a bulletin board to tell a story in sequence, thus creating the first storyboard. Furthermore, it was Disney who first recognized the necessity for studios to maintain a separate “story department” with specialized storyboard artists (that is, a new occupation distinct from animators), as he had realized that audiences would not watch a film unless its story gave them a reason to care about the characters.[2][3][4] The second studio to switch from “story sketches” to storyboards was Walter Lantz Productions in early 1935,[5] by 1936 Harman-Ising and Leon Schlesinger Productions also followed suit. By 1937 or 1938, all American animation studios were using storyboards. Wikipedia

What is Concept Art?

Concept art is a form of illustration used to convey an idea for use in (but not limited to) films, video games, animation, or comic books before it is put into the final product.[1]Concept art is also referred to as visual development and/or concept design.[2] …

History Disney and Concept Art

Who popularized or even invented the term “concept art” in reference to pre-production design is perhaps ambiguous, although references to the term can be found being used by Disney as early as the 1930s.[4] …

Concept artists

A concept artist is an individual who generates a visual design for an item, character, or area that does not yet exist.[citation needed] This includes, but is not limited to, film, animation, and more recently video game production. A concept artist may be required for nothing more than preliminary artwork, or may be part of a creative team until a project reaches fruition.[citation needed] While it is necessary to have the skills of a fine artist, a concept artist must also be able to work to strict deadlines in the capacity of a graphic designer. – Wikipedia

 Concept

1

 Concept

 Concept

2

tower

3b Concept

3c

 Concept

The concept drawings above help develop these characters.

A storyboard [below] is a series of quick sketches that not onlly allude to concept but also relate a progression of activity.

The above section of storyboard begins at about minute 19 in the movie.  Following are individual frames of the storyboard, along with actual frames of the finished animation.

4a

4a2

4b

You don’t actually see this view of the hall at the point that it is shown on the storyboard.  It does not appear until minute 41:56.

4b2

; but the storyboard is an idea place.  As the movie develops, the idea of the hall and the gallery in that hall is developed.

 Concept

The above concept sketch of the gallery hall is not actually part of the final animation; but he king will refer to these family portraits in the finished animation.

4c

4

5a

5

6a

6

In developing a character, multiple concept sketches in varying activity are often drawn.

cinderella-concept-art

More finished sketches follow

cinderella-concept-art4 Even more finished drawings often follow those.

 Concept

About minute 21

7

Minute 21

8a

 Concept

The above invitation is not actually shown in the final animation–at least not more than in a glance, as it swishes from hand to hand.

10g

Minute 22:40

10

Minute 24:30

11

12

 

Minute 29

13

Minute 30

14

14aa

14a

godmother

Minute 34

godmother2 15

This part of the storyboard begins at minute, while the Fairy Godmother sings

Bippity-Boppity-Boo:

storyboard2

16a

17a

17a1

Notice how the pumpkin is lightened–given more contrast–to increase its importance and emphasize its magic.

17a1b

On the above storyboard image, the pumpkin in the background  is shown with the mice in the foreground; within a few frames, the mice are involved in the action.

Again, remember that the storyboard is an idea.  The actual animation grows from that idea and often will change.

17a2

The above concept sketch is not actually shown on the storyboard; but it does appear in the final animation.

18a 19a

18

18a3

20a

18a2

21a

22a

23a

24A 25A

In the final animation, magical stars imply the godmother’s touching the horse.  You do not actually see that happening–nor do you see all of the carriage, as the horse flies above.  One more time:  the storyboard is the idea.  The animation evolves from that idea.

26A

27A

27

28A

29A

30A

cinderella-concept-art3

Cinderella_Ballgown_Concept_Art_2

30cc

31A

CinderellaBds14

 Concept

31f Final at Minute 42:30

Concept art

32a Storyboard Sketch

 Concept

32

33a The fleeing scenes are not finished as shown in the storyboard sketches; but the feeling of this section does not change.

33

34a Storyboard sketch – Cinderella is going opposite direction

34

35a Storyboard sketch – Prince is going opposite direction

35Why do you think that it is light and bright in front of the Prince and dark behind him?

36a Storyboard Sketch

Concept Art

36

Final animation at minute 44

37a

39a Concept

39

Final animation at minute 45:24

Note the use of shadows and facial expression to convey mood!

Locked_away_2

footman

Concept Art

40

Finished animation at minute 52:23

40d

40a Concept Art

Storyboard Template

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About jackikellum

Jacki Kellum is a Fine Artist, a Designer, and also a writer. For one of her graduate programs, she wrote her thesis on William Blake. Like Blake, much of Kellum's work is about childhood and lost innocence. Also like Blake, Kellum strives to both write and illustrate her work. .
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